Monday, February 02, 2009

ENTRY # EIGHTY EIGHT.

Good Morning.


I am going to try and remember the time in my young life that I worked in a grocery store, and let you see the great difference in that store and the ones that you have in this day.


This would have been the store that I left to go to Memphis, Tennessee. to be married to the sweetest girl on this earth. This was November of the year 1935.

I am going to show you a picture of that store below, and give you the names of the people that you see working there, it's sad to me but all those except I and one of the girls have passed away, sometimes I ask myself why me, it has to be God's mercy and nothing else.

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(Click on the picture to make it larger, and then see if you recognize any of the brands of products.)

GStore1

In the picture above the man taking an order from a customer is my uncle A.E. White . In ther rear going from left to right is Dad talking too my cousin Dorthy, and the next one is Ralph White talking to Edgar Ford one of our customers.

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Now I want to tell you just a little of how this store worked. It was of course not self-service. Nothing was in that day, even the service station owners would run out to your car when you stopped, begin to clean your windshield and check your oil, and then fill your otank, and believe it or not he would say THANK YOU FOR STOPPING, when you drove away. The man with the pencil and writing pad was my uncle A.E.White, and he was taking an order from this lady that would be filled after she left the store and then delivered to her home.


There was no such things as shopping carts or check out lanes,And notice the shelving in the old store all wood. No refrigeration of any kind, no egg cartons, they were just put in a paper bag.

The following picture is an enlargement of a portion of the picture above. This one shows the people better. On the far left, that man is old Dad. I’m talking to a customer. The man in the back with the apron on is my brother, Ralph. He is talking to a man wearing a hat. The man in the foreground is my Uncle A.E. White, the owner of the store. You can see the pencil and pad in his hand as he takes an order from the lady on the other side of the counter.

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(Click on the picture to make it larger, and then see if you recognize any of the brands of products.)


GStore02

This picture is the same as the one above from a different view, but the same people.

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And another thing before I forget it, money was not very plentiful in those days and sometimes the customer would bring things in to trade for their groceries, like butter, live chickens, eggs and almost any kind of vegetables that they produced, and Uncle A,E would take all this in on the price of their grocery bill. Sometimes he would give me the job of checking all this stuff in. But it did not bother me, for about that time I was thinking about other things.

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I AM SURE THAT YOU NOTICED THOSE LARGE BAGS ON THE FLOOR, THAT WAS MEAL AND FLOUR. WE SOLD A LOT OF THAT, BECAUSE WE HAD TO BAKE OUR OWN BISCUITS AND CORNBREAD FROM SCRATCH. NO CONVIENCE FOODS OF ANY KIND, NOT EVEN A MICROWAVE OVEN. BUT WE LOVED THOSE BIG BISCUITS AND CREAM GRAVY THAT MY MOTHER WAS AN EXPERT AT MAKING, I WAS THE FIRST ONE AT THE TABLE EACH MORNING. THOSE OLD DAYS WERE NOT TOO BAD, WERE THEY. DAD...

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THIS IS ALL THAT I AM GOING TO HAVE FOR A FEW DAYS, I AM WAITING ON A PICTURE OF THE INSIDE OF A MODERN SUPER MARKET THAT WE CAN COMPARE WITH THE OLD TIME STORE.

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BYE FOR A FEW DAYS, DAD,

865-850-5763..

© 2009 Dad's Tomato Garden Journal...All Rights Reserved.

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7 Comments:

At 9:47 PM, Blogger JCWillow99@gmail.com..( Cassie) said...

I enjoyed the picture, and hearing about how things use to be.
That was a good looking store, neat as a pin.
I recall when they use to put gas in my mothers car and always washed the windshield.

 
At 4:58 AM, Anonymous Becky said...

DAD! I LOVE LOVE LOVE this story and picture. I can remember full service gas stations... I think we had full service gas stations for a lot longer than we had groceries delivered to the house, because I can't remember groceries delivered to the house. Sure would be nice, though, not to have to lug all those bags in from the car!

You and your brother are very handsome young men! I bet there is a lot you miss about these days... especially your beautiful LaVerne. Seems like "service" used to mean a lot more to businesses than it does now. On the other hand, I suppose some things are better now.

I was so excited about you sharing this picture and story. I love getting to view life through someone else's eyes, especially about times when I wasn't around yet. It's interesting to see how things were done. A picture is worth a thousand words!

Thanks again... keep these stories and pictures coming! Big hug for you!

 
At 11:32 AM, Blogger Mandy said...

Thanks for sharing Grandpa! I love to hear about your life. You have done so much and seen so much. Keep the stories coming!!

Lots of love,
Mandy

 
At 9:41 AM, Blogger Ally Lifewithally said...

Lovely story Dad ~ thanks for sharing your memories ~ Ally x

 
At 1:05 AM, Blogger Bryan said...

Thank you DAD, for the pictures and story of life in a store many moons ago! This is the first time I have ever commented on your site. Please accept my apologies for taking so long, as you are a man of great love, truth and wisdom. Although we have never met in person, DAD, we share something very, very special. The same faith. Keep on keeping on DAD, and thanks again! A Friend, Bryan (NW Washington State)

 
At 9:46 AM, Blogger Carlene Noggle said...

Hi Dad, this is the first ti,me that I have been here to see the grocery store! I love this! I didn't realize that folks could go in and order the groceries to be delivered to your house!!! How good was that!!!
love ya,
carlene

 
At 1:22 PM, Blogger Sayit-baldys said...

DAD,
THIS ENTRY BROUGHT BACK MEMORIES TO ME OF THE COUNTRY STORE THAT OUR FAMILY OPERATED IN THE FLINTROCK HILLS OF EASTERN OKLAHOMA.
THIS WAS ALSO IN THE 1930S AS WAS YOUR STORE EXPERIENCES.
SOMETIMES HAD TO SHOO A CAT OUT OF A BARREL TO FILL AN ORDER.

OUR FAMILY COUNTRY STORE WAS A MUCH SMALLER OPERATION THAN THE ONE YOU WORKED IN, DAD.

DURING WINTER MONTHS WE HAD A POT BELLIED HEATING STOVE IN THE CENTER PART OF THE AREA WHERE NEIGHBORING FARMERS AND AN OCCASIONAL TOURIST GATHERED AROUND TELLING TALES, SOMETIMES QUESTIONABLE.

AS NOW, THERE WERE THEN SOME THAT ALSO TALKED WITH THEIR HANDS. GETTING INTO THE HEART OF THE STORY AND GYRATING HANDS AND ARMS, THE BANANA STALK HANGING FROM THE CEILING SUFFERED SOME BACKHAND BLOWS AS THE ARM WAS ADDING EMPHASIS TO THE STORY.
DAD I AM SURE THERE MUST HAVE BEEN STALKS OF BANANAS HANGING IN THE STORE YOU WORKED IN, THEY JUST DID NOT APPEAR IN YOUR PHOTO.

KEROSENE WAS AN IMPORTANT ITEM AT OUR COUNTRY STORE.
THE KEROSENE BARREL WAS KEPT OUTSIDE, NEVER LOCKED. A CUSTOMER COULD FILL THEIR OWN CAN AND LET US KNOW HOW MUCH TO CHARGE. THE PRICE WAS TEN CENTS A GALLON.
THERE WERE NO ELECTRIC LINES IN OUR NEIGHBORHOOD, SO OF COURSE LAMPS USED A LOT OF KEROSENE.

ANOTHER ITEM SOLD IN SPRING AND SUMMER WAS ONE HUNDRED POUND BAGS OF CANE SUGAR. BLACKBERRY TIME MEANT CANNING TIME FOR BERRIES AND JELLY MAKING. THESE TIMES WERE THE GREAT DEPRESSION TIMES AND MOST FAMILIES WERE THINKING AHEAD FOR THE COMING WINTER'S FOOD SUPPLY. THEN TOO WERE VEGETABLES, FRUIT INCLUDING PLUMS, PEACHES, APPLES, GRAPES FOR JUICE AND WINE.

NOT TO FORGET FOOD FOR THE HORSES AND COWS. FILL THAT BARN LOFT WITH HAY AND OATS IN THE GRAIN BINS.

WE 'UNS BACK YONDER IN THEM THAR HILLS IN THE OZARK FOOTHILLS HAINT HAD HIT BADLY LACK THIM CITY 'UNS.
WE HEERED UV THE SOUP LINES AN TAKE YUR BUCKIT TO GIT SUPPER.

(THOUGHT THE MODERN DAY CHILDREN WOULD ENJOY HEARING HOW SOME OLD TIMERS TALKED).

HOPEFULLY NO MORE DEPRESSIONS.
sam

 

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